23 months

Have you and Baby set up her next well-child visit? she’s nearly two, which means she’s nearly ready to have another physical exam where her pediatrician checks on her growth and development, and then she gets a lead screening and any vaccines she might need.

Doctor’s appointments can get a little trickier as Baby gets older, since she is getting more likely to remember if she didn’t have so much fun last time she went to the doctor. That doesn’t mean that she will be upset about a doctor’s office visit, though, and she still takes a lot of her cues for how she’s going to react to a situation based on how you act. The calmer and more unbothered you are about Baby’s next checkup, the more likely she is to be calm about it, too.

One of the great things about Baby is that she has so many fewer preconceived ideas about what a situation should be like – for all she knows, going to the doctor for a checkup can be as fun as any day at the park. And why shouldn’t it be? Especially if Baby is a little bit of a ham, spending a little time with a friendly adult who wants to know everything about her can be a lot of fun, and she’ll have you there with her every step of the way, to keep everything feeling safe and secure and running smoothly.

The reason that Baby has so few preconceived ideas is that she is still learning so much. There are thousands of things you do in a day without even thinking about them, that Baby still needs to learn how to do. Climbing the stairs, for example – unless you’re climbing a really tall staircase, it probably doesn’t take up to much of your day, but for Baby, the process of learning to climb up and down them easily can take years. By this point, she can probably climb up them, but only by following a two-feet-per-step pattern – she’ll get to the point where she can manage an alternating one-foot-per-step, but it’ll take time, practice, coordination, and maybe a little bit longer legs before she gets there. Climbing down the stairs again can take just as long, or even longer, depending on how many chances she has to practice.

If there are no stairs in your home, and Baby doesn’t practice climbing them very often, no matter how adventurous or curious she is, the process of learning to climb the stairs is going to take a little longer. As she’s learning, your supervision is an important part of keeping her safe. Baby gates are a great way to keep Baby from practicing her stair climbing when you aren’t there to watch her.

Milestones

  • Starts showing a hand preference: Between the ages of about 2 and 3, your toddler will start to make whether she’s right-handed or left-handed more clear, but now, as she gets closer and closer to age 2, she is probably starting to use one hand a little more than the other already.
  • Running: Running is one of those milestones that toddlers can reach at a huge range of different times, and part of the reason for the variation is just personality – some toddlers start running sooner because they just feel like there’s so much to run about. A large number of toddlers have started running by 23 months, though. If your toddler is just getting started moving her feet a little faster, look out – once a toddler starts running, it can be hard to get her to stop!


Sources
  • T. Berry Brazelton, M.D., Touchpoints: Birth to Three, 2nd Edition, Joshua D. Sparrow, M.D., De Capo Press. 2006. Print.
  • Celia A. Brownell, Stephanie S. Iesue, Sara R. Nichols, Margarita Svetlova. “Mine or Yours? Development of Sharing in Toddlers in Relationship to Ownership Understanding.” Child Development. 84(3): 906-920. May 2013. Retrieved June 23 2017. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3578097/.
  • M. Dapretto, E.L. Bjork. “The development of word-retrieval abilities in the second year and its relation to early vocabulary growth.” Child Development. 71(3): 635-48. May-June 2000. Retrieved June 23 2017. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10953930.
  • Mary L. Gavin. “Growth and Your 1-to-2-Year-Old.” KidsHealth. The Nemours Foundation, January 2015. Retrieved June 23 2017. http://kidshealth.org/en/parents/grow12yr.html.
  • Alison Gopnik, Andrew Meltzoff. “The Development of Categorization in the Second Year and its Relation to other Cognitive and Linguistic Developments.” Child Development. 1987. Retrieved June 23 2017. http://ilabs.washington.edu/meltzoff/pdf/87Gopnik_Meltzoff_ChildDev.pdf.
  • Laura Markham. “Toddlers: Social, Solitary and Parallel Play.” Aha! Parenting. Dr. Laura Markham. Retrieved June 23 2017. http://www.ahaparenting.com/ask-the-doctor-1/toddlers-social-solitary-and-parallel-play.
  • Rebecca Parlakian, Claire Lerner. “From Baby to Big Kid: Month 20.” Zero to Three. ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers, and Families, May 12 2016. Retrieved June 23 2017. https://www.zerotothree.org/resources/1249-from-baby-to-big-kid-month-20.
  • Rebecca Parlakian, Claire Lerner. “From Baby to Big Kid: Month 17.” Zero to Three. ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers, and Families, May 12 2016. Retrieved June 23 2017. https://www.zerotothree.org/resources/1246-from-baby-to-big-kid-month-17.
  • Raising Children Network. “12-15 months: toddler development.” Raising Children. Raising Children Network, August 22 2016. Retrieved June 23 2017. http://raisingchildren.net.au/articles/child_development_12-15_months.html/context/563.
  • Raising Children Network. “15-18 months: toddler development.” Raising Children. Raising Children Network, February 1 2016. Retrieved June 23 2017. http://raisingchildren.net.au/articles/child_development_15-18_months.html/context/563.
  • Raising Children Network. “18-24 months: toddler development.” Raising Children. Raising Children Network, September 2 2016. Retrieved June 23 2017. http://raisingchildren.net.au/articles/child_development_18-24_months.html/context/563.
  • Raising Children Network. “Language Development: 1-2 years.” Raising Children. Raising Children, January 2 2016. Retrieved June 23 2017. http://raisingchildren.net.au/articles/language_development_1_to_2_years.html/context/563.
  • Jessica A. Sommerville, Marco F. H. Schmidt, Jung-eun Yun. “The Development of Fairness Expectations and Prosocial Behavior in the Second Year of Life.” Infancy. 18(1): 40-66. January-February 2013. Retrieved June 23 2017. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1532-7078.2012.00129.x/abstract.
  • “12-24 Months: All About Words.” Multilingual Children. Multilingual Children’s Association, 2004. Retrieved June 23 2017. http://www.multilingualchildren.org/milestones/second_year.html.
  • “18 Months.” PediNeuroLogic Exam. University of Utah Health Sciences Library. Retrieved June 23 2016. http://library.med.utah.edu/pedineurologicexam/html/18month.html.
  • “2017 Recommended Immunizations for Children from Birth through 6 Years Old.” CDC. Centers for Control and Prevention, December 2016. Retrieved June 23 2017. https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents/downloads/parent-ver-sch-0-6yrs.pdf.
  • “Developmental Milestones: 2 Year Olds.” HealthyChildren. American Academy of Pediatrics, June 1 2009. Retrieved June 23 2017. https://www.healthychildren.org/English/ages-stages/toddler/Pages/Developmental-Milestones-2-Year-Olds.aspx.
  • “Important Milestones: Your Child by One Year.” CDC. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, August 15 2016. Retrieved June 23 2017. https://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/actearly/milestones/milestones-1yr.html.
  • “Language Delays in Toddlers: Information for Parents.” HealthyChildren. American Academy of Pediatrics, November 18 2011. Retrieved June 23 2017. https://www.healthychildren.org/English/ages-stages/toddler/Pages/Language-Delay.aspx.
  • “Toddlers (1-2 years of age).” CDC. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, January 3 2017. Retrieved June 23 2017. https://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/childdevelopment/positiveparenting/toddlers.html.
  • “Your busy toddler: Games, toys and play in the second year of life.” Caring for Kids. Canadian Paediatric Society, May 2017. Retrieved June 23 2017. http://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/handouts/your_busy_toddler. 
Get the Ovia Parenting app
Get our app at the Apple App Store Get our app at the Apple App Store Get our app at the Google Play Store Get our app at the Google Play Store