Why so many more moms are getting noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT)


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Noninvasive prenatal testing is on the rise, and for expecting moms who are interested in genetic screening for their babies, but are concerned about safety, accuracy, and timing, NIPT is pretty exciting. Here are a few reasons why NIPT has taken off.

It’s safer than ever before

One of the major concerns about prenatal genetic testing is about protecting your baby’s safety, which makes a lot of sense. What draws many people to NIPT is that it’s noninvasive, which means that the test doesn’t come into contact with your baby.

During pregnancy, some pieces of your baby’s DNA enter your bloodstream from the placenta. NIPT is a simple blood test that looks at a baby’s DNA in his mother’s blood to identify whether the baby is at increased risk of having a genetic disorder. Not only does NIPT itself pose no risk of miscarriage, it leads to 89% fewer invasive tests compared to traditional serum screening.

It’s very accurate

NIPT is the most accurate prenatal aneuploidy screening test available – this means it does a great job of detecting certain chromosomal abnormalities. In fact, it has the highest detection rate of all currently available chromosomal screening tests. NIPT detects 99.7% of cases of Down syndrome.

There’s a reason why medical societies like the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics and the International Society for Prenatal Diagnosis endorse NIPT as a fetal aneuploidy screening option for all pregnant women: it’s safe and accurate.

You can get it done early

Many expecting moms are eager to get as much done during the first trimester as possible. If NIPT is something you’re interested in, you can have the test as early as week 10! If your ducks aren’t in a row by then, there’s no need to worry. NIPT can be performed at any point after that as well.

NIPT is an excellent option if you want a safe and accurate way to learn more about the genetic health risks of your pregnancy early on. NIPT is an available options for all women, regardless of age or priority risk. NIPT may be right for you if:

  • You want more information about whether a genetic condition is present in your pregnancy
  • You are concerned about a genetic condition in your baby
  • You are unsure if you want invasive diagnostic testing (like amniocentesis or CVS)
  • You want the most accurate prenatal aneuploidy screening test for chromosomal conditions
  • Your doctor has recommended it for you

To learn more about NIPT, tap the link below.


Learn more

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Noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) is a screening test; it is not diagnostic. Results should be confirmed by diagnostic testing prior to making any pregnancy management decisions.


Sources
  • Bianchi DW, Parker RL, Wentworth J, et al. DNA sequencing versus standard prenatal aneuploidy screening. N Engl J Med. 2014;370(9):799-808.
  • American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Screening for fetal aneuploidy. Practice Bulletin No. 163. Obstet Gynecol. 2016; 127(5):e123-137.
  • Benn P, Borrell A, Chiu RWK, et al. Position statement from the Chromosome Abnormality Screening Committee on behalf of the Board of the International Society for Prenatal Diagnosis. Prenat Diagn. 2015;35(8):725-734. doi:10.1002/pd.4608.
  • Gregg AR, Skotko BG, Benkendorf JL, et al. Noninvasive prenatal screening for fetal aneuploidy, 2016 update: a position statement of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics. Genet Med. 2016: doi:10.1038/gim.2016.97.
  • Bianchi DW, Parker RL, Wentworth J, et al. DNA sequencing versus standard prenatal aneuploidy screening. N Engl J Med. 2014;370(9):799-808.
  • Chudova DI, Sehnert AJ, Bianchi DW. Copy-number variation and false positive prenatal screening results. N Engl J Med. 2016;375(1):97-98.
  • Gil MM, Accurti V, Santacruz B, Plana MN, Nicolaides KH. Analysis of cell-free DNA in maternal blood in screening for fetal aneuploidies: updated meta-analysis. Ultrasound Obstet Gynecol. 2017;50(3):302-314.
  • Vanderbilt University Medical Center. “Non-Invasive Prenatal Screening’s Popularity on the Rise.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 19 January 2017. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/01/170119111318.htm.
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