Suggested immunization schedule for your baby’s second year and onward through early childhood

The vaccinations that your little one received in their first year put them on a powerful path of protection against serious disease and illness. The immunizations that she will receive in theirs second year and onward through early childhood will continue to do the same. Many of the first doses of the vaccines that Baby received in theirs first year will be followed up with final doses during these years to fully protect her from those diseases. You can expect more vaccines later in childhood and into the teen years, as well as some shots that will be given every year, like the flu shot.

The recommended immunization schedule for most all children ages two through four is as follows:

18 months old

  • Diphtheria, Tetanus, and acellular Pertussis (DTaP) — 4th dose (can be given at 15-18 months old)
  • Hepatitis A (HepA) — 2nd dose

2 years old

  • Influenza (IIV or LAIV) — 1-2 doses annually* (see notes below)

3 years old

  • Influenza (IIV or LAIV) — 1-2 doses annually* (see notes below)

4 years old

  • Diphtheria, Tetanus, and acellular Pertussis (DTaP) — 5th dose (can be given at 4-6 years old)
  • Inactivated poliovirus (IPV) — 4th dose
  • Influenza (IIV or LAIV) — 1-2 doses annually* (see notes below)
  • Measles, Mumps, and Rubella (MMR) — 2nd dose (can be given at 4-6 years old)
  • Varicella (VAR) — 2nd dose (can be given at 4-6 years old)

The diseases these vaccines protect against can be particularly dangerous for children, so it’s important that Baby sticks with a regular immunization schedule. If your little one misses a scheduled vaccination for any reason, be sure to let your child’s healthcare provider know so that they can help Baby get back on track as soon as possible. If you have any questions about immunizations, you should speak with your child’s healthcare provider — they’re there to help. 

*A note on the Influenza (IIV or LAIV), or flu, vaccines. If a child of this age has received at least two influenza vaccine doses before July 1, 2019, they should now receive one dose. If a child of this age has received fewer than two influenza vaccine doses before July 1, 2019, or whose influenza vaccination history is unknown, they should now receive two doses. Following this, they should then get a flu shot (or shots) again each year.

Learn more about vaccines


Sources
  • “Table 1. Recommended Child and Adolescent Immunization Schedule for ages 18 years or younger, United States, 2020.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, February 3 2020. Retrieved March 23 2020. https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/schedules/hcp/imz/child-adolescent.html.
  • “Vaccine for Flu (Influenza).” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, August 2 2019. Retrieved March 23 2020. https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents/diseases/flu.html.

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